Shipwreck Stories

Carol_Coin

Magazine Articles

You can download pdf's of each of these articles at X-Ray Mag, International Dive Lifestyle Magazine. Click here to access the X-Ray Archive landing page, then scroll down the page to find the appropriate issue number, and download:

“I saw a large piece of a ship’s mast from a vessel of at least 120 tons. I tried to haul it aboard but was not able to.” These evocative words, recorded by Christopher Columbus in his personal log on September 11, 1492, illustrate how fragile and uncertain was life at sea during the epoch of the great wooden sailing ships...

Then I saw the things brought to the King from the new Land of Gold... all manner of wondrous weapons... all sorts of marvelous objects for the human use which are much more beautiful to behold than things spoken of in fairy tales... In all the days of my life I have seen nothing which so filled my heart with joy as these things. For I saw amongst them wondrous artful treasures, and I marveled over the subtle genius of those men in strange countries. Indeed I cannot tell enough of the things which I saw there before me...

When translated, the Chinese word Ming expresses brightness, luminosity, and illumination. Approximately four centuries ago, a merchant ship sank in more than 50 meters of water off of the Indonesian coast. Her cargo: thousands upon thousands of precious Chinese Ming Dynasty porcelain wares, crafted during the reign of the Wanli emperor, who ruled from 1572-1620 AD...

It is November—late hurricane season—and the wind has been an almost constant presence in the Florida Straits, whipping up whitecaps in these capricious waters where nearly 400 years ago, in 1622, the treasure galleon Santa Margarita sank, victim of a “storme and fearful tempest.”

Shortly after her destruction, one Captain Don Pedro de Aguilar y Guzmán wrote of the event, “…and also there was lost the galleon Santa Margarita in which {Captain} Don Bernardino de Lugo came … lost with all the silver, except that about twenty soldiers and the said Captain, who escaped swimming...”